go

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1. go (eclipsing), prep., with; folld. by poss. gona, 792, 1085, 5785-87; go n-onóir 7 go n-aird-innmhe, 893; go n-easbaidh 7 go n-anshódh, 914; the noun governed by go may itself eclipse a foll. adj. or gen. go ndícheall ndofhaisnéise, 1852; go bhfios damhsa, ‘to my knowledge, I am sure,’ 1101   2. go, prep. to, up to, etc.; prefixing h to vowels, 2181; with art. gusan, 81; gusna, 3; with rel. gusa, 7095; with pronn. chugat, 4426; chugad, 2675; chuige, 208; chuice, 1859; chugainn, 2386; chugaibh, 7100; chuca, 1469; with poss. pron. gó a, 8226. 1. As simple prep.: (a) mainly after verbs of motion, dol, teacht, triall, etc.; cf. 123, 309, 569, 676, 737, 1032, 1960, 3972, 7095, etc.; also after sgríobhadh, ‘to write to one,’ 264, 1194, 4385; (b) ‘up to, till,’ déanam éighmhe go neamh ‘clamemus in caelum,’ 4481; go bruinne an bhrátha, 11; gusan dtráth soin, 196; go bás, 694; often in correlation with ó, ‘from x to y,’ 121, 167, 2588, etc.; (c) in temporal clauses, before vn. folld. by do of the agent, go fagháil bháis dó, ‘till he dies,’ 321; 2262, 4597; go beith glan dóibh, 525; 6211; go díol a fhiach dhó, 6272, 7235, 7795, 7920, 8641, 9191, 10882; (d) prefixed to adjj., to form advv., go héasgaidh, 4400; 1582, 1613, 1656, 1721, 1848. 2. The pronominal forms have been partly differentiated in use from the simple. [In the spoken language they are associated with chum (dochum), which is avoided by Keating, though common in his contemporaries.] They are found with vbs. of motion, and the like: chéimnigheas...chugad, 2675; coimhrithid...chuige, 3909; rithid, 10679; do chuir, 5604; ní bhfuair E. ann féin cur chuca, ‘E. could not find it in his heart to attack them,’ 10168; gabhaim, ‘to receive to oneself,’ 208, 1469, 1859, 2281, 8590, p. 273, 10139; léigean, 6253; lingeadh, 7100; slogadh, 9539; tairrngim, 1910; tig, 2386, 5754; teacht, 10824; triall, 4426; atach ná eadarghuidhe do dhéanamh chuige, 5955   3. go (eclipsing), conj., that, so that, until; with ro, gur, 60; go ro, 3639; with cop., gur, gurab, gurbh [see Grammatical Introduction]; introducing indirect speech, 22, 23; with subj., go dtí, ‘until there come,’ 5045; go nach, 8773, 10979; often as connective particle in cpd. conj., ar eagla go, do bhríogh go, ionnus go, tar ceann go, mar go, etc.

Trí Bior-Ghaoithe an Bháis: The Three Shafts of Death. Author: Geoffrey Keating. Editor: Osborn Bergin.

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