Compound Nouns and Adjectives

 

Compound nouns are used frequently in Early Modern Irish.

 

Nominal compounds are formed by two nouns, the first of which functions like an adjective, the second of which is lenited.

Examples:

a) Two nouns:

 

braon-mhagh (Damian McManus, “An Nua-Ghaeilge Chlasaiceach,” p. 389)

caithir-lios (Damian McManus, “An Nua-Ghaeilge Chlasaiceach,” p. 389) [cathair made slender in order to agree with the slender consonant in lios]

triath-mhac (Damian McManus, “An Nua-Ghaeilge Chlasaiceach,” p. 389)

 

b) Noun + Adjective:

 

bog-chridhe (Damian McManus, “An Nua-Ghaeilge Chlasaiceach,” p. 389)

caoil-shlighe (Damian McManus, “An Nua-Ghaeilge Chlasaiceach,” p. 389) [caol made slender in order to agree with the slender consonant in slighe]

 

 

 

Adjectival compounds are formed by a noun and an adjective, which functions adverbially.

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